Spring Fever (2009) 春風沉醉的晚上

Country: China
Language: Mandarin
Runtime: 116 minutes
Director: Lou Ye
Starring: Qin Hao, Chen Sicheng, Tan Zhuo, Wu Wei, Jiang Jiaqi
Theme: LGBT Issues

Ratings:
IMDb.com: 6.4/10 | Rotten Tomatoes: 50% | Metacritic: 64/100

Film Festivals:
2009 Cannes Film Festival

Awards:
2009 Cannes Film Festival: Best Screenplay

Nominations:
2009 Cannes Film Festival: Palme d’Or

I thought it worthy to catch this movie in the theatres during its limited run given its numerous accolades at Cannes 2009 serving as a backdrop to the film. There is French investment and support in this film that Lou Ye released in spite of a five-year ban imposed on filmmaking given his involvement in the seminal Summer Palace (2006) which portrayed the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacres in a pro-democratic light. And this is evident through the French subtitles included with the film. Further, it is noteworthy that the film was shot discreetly amidst the drab industrial landscape of Nanjing using a video recorder, and then transferred onto the 35mm format. This nondescript measure is characteristic of the Sixth Generation filmmaking wave that Lou Ye himself is a part of. Using the documentary style of cinema vérité, the film appears to be a biographical story of the lead characters. The style’s jarring nature taking on heightened relevance given the underground and taboo homosexual relationships the protagonists find themselves engaged in. Natural lighting is used throughout the film, which means most of the intense sex sequences for instance that take place are poorly-lit, save for the minimal moonshine that casts a bluish glow within the room. The audience becomes the voyeur—or the peeping tom even—glimpsing into their psyches and peeping at their intimate actions. Lending credence to this whole indie, underground edgy feel is the typography used at the start of the film that is a throwback to Chinese films of the 1960s era, and which fits perfectly with the extreme grain and noise of the shots.

The opening shot is of flower petals in a pond, and the literary allegories are evident. Referencing a 1923 work by Chinese author Yu Dafu, the voiceover regales “Drunken nights without hope, like this one: I spend them wandering outside until the sky grows pale.” The camera cuts away to a shot that focuses on the scenery outside a moving vehicle, the fast-moving trees and the shaky shots creating a jarring nauseating sense right from the start that persists throughout the film. We see the male leads holding hands in the car, peeing by the river as they exit the car, and sharing an intimate smooch in public. This is also perhaps the happiest moment of the brooding film, an instant of unbridled joy and ecstasy at being in the embrace of a loved one. The scene is “dissonant and jarring, the film’s sounds and images oscillate between lust and frustration, and as the past and present are hauntingly blurred, so too are the identities of the story’s characters.” (Gonzalez, 2010). Later, as the couple engages in sensual acts in public grounds like a bookstore, it all appears brief, fleeting and unfulfilling. Allegories to nature are evident, and the handheld camera focuses a lot on rain pattering on the roofs outside, the lotus roots, etc. The first instance of trouble beckons when we see a camera-toting photographer spying on the intimate actions and snapping some shots, and we soon learn that one of the characters are married and he is a private investigator hired by a jealous wife who suspects infidelity, but not expecting it to be with another man. There is confrontation, there is embarrassment, and there is shaming.

Fast forward to a series of nightclub scenes, and we see a more gritty misè-en-scène with loads of color and campy music. The lead Jiang Cheng (Qin Hao) is a crossdresser who sings in the nightclub, albeit a very bad tone deaf one because his singing was, really, unbearable. The private investigator, Luo Haitao (Chen Sicheng) trails Jiang to the nightclub and unwittingly discovers his bisexual tendencies and falls in love with the protagonist during his moment of fraililty at having undergone a nasty fight with his lover, Wang Ping (Wu Wei) over his wife. We see Luo Haitao engaging in scenes with Jiang Cheng that parallel the original relationship between Jiang and Wang – a shower scene being the most affective with the two characters in the bathroom sharing erotic moments of soaping each other and kissing. But Luo also has a girlfriend, and Jiang chooses to let her come in between the two of them this time round in light of what happened during the original relationship. They share moments of passion when the girlfriend is not around, but is caught in the act. The pop ditty by Pu Shu and covered by Fan Weiqi “那些花兒“ (loosely translated as Those Flowers) is the theme of this movie, with the lyrics bearing a direct reference to the story thread and the frequent flower lotus references made (“The flowers have been blown away by the wind and scattered in the horizon”)

Wang Ping soon commits suicide at the top of a picturesque and deserted hill, much to the loss of Jiang Cheng who ditched him, and to the agony of his wife Li Jing (Tan Zhuo) – how how foolish she must have been that her confrontations would have done good for the relationship. In what is an exceptionally gory scene in the climax, Li JIng attacks Jiang Cheng in public, and the subsequent scene provides an insight into the apparent apathy of the mainland Chinese public as Jiang Cheng lies on the road, bleeding, with nary a soul willing to stop and help, all opting to stare instead.

Au (2010) brings up a pertinent continuity issue in the disparity in tension between the first half of the story that was abandoned in the second half, as Luo Haitao was the single individual who disrupted Jiang Cheng’s first relationship, and the entire guilt or irony this must have encompassed was totally ignored when he himself got involved. Work remains work, one might say, but this argument is, really, tangible at best.

The film is undoubtedly arthouse, and a very disjointed one at that. The ban means that China has cut all ties with the production of this film, and it was registered as a Hong Kong/French co-production instead, despite the director being Chinese. Such a tactic to bypass the Chinese censors is certainly noteworthy and interesting, as this precedent may provide an avenue for future directors to address more controversial topics and be able to work outside the purview of the Chinese censorship board. The film captures the meandering nature of the Chinese homosexual, driven by purposeless eroticism and sex and drifting through the motions of life as they struggle to come to terms with themselves.

References

Au, A. (2010, November 19). Amnesia of the sensual: the film Spring Fever. Retrieved on November 25, 2010, from http://yawningbread.wordpress.com/2010/11/19/amnesia-of-the-sensual-the-film-spring-fever/

Gonzalez, E. (2010, August 1). Spring fever. Retrieved on November 25 2010, from http://www.slantmagazine.com/film/review/spring-fever/4925

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